Category Archives: television

X-Factor 6:2

The new blog may have started, but it won’t contain material like this. In the spirit of silly fun, I’ll again be liveblogging tonight’s second episode of series 6 of X-Factor. Will anyone be able to stop the Danyl Johnson juggernaut? At 7pm BST:

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[NOW CLOSED but still viewable]

X-Factor 6:1

This year I’m not going to tweet my comments about the new series of X-Factor, I’m going to liveblog them. You’re welcome to add your comments as well (and by Twitter, if you let me know in advance that you’d like to). It’ll kick off at 7pm BST and that’s when you:

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[NOW CLOSED but still viewable]

Doctor Who: The End of Time (HUGE SPOILERS)

The trailer hasn’t officially been released in the UK yet, but it was shown at the San Diego Comicon, and originally put onto YouTube by safia43. Don’t click unless you really want to know who is going to ‘knock four times’ and presumably bring about the death of the Tenth Doctor in the Christmas special two-parter!
SPOILER WARNING!

When David Snogged John…

From the San Diego Comicon:

So very Barrowman of course, but bravo to Tennant, who’ll be very sorely missed for so very many reasons…

(via The Gay-Atheist)

Doctor Who: The Waters of Mars (Trailer)

Oh now this is exciting. Not just a creepy story in its own right but an ultra-dark lead-in to Ten’s last hurrah…

I’m sure I’m not alone in knowing mostly where this is going, but I’m dead curious to learn the hows & whys.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

SPOILERS!

Torchwood: Children of Earth: Day Five (Spoilers)

No happy ending as Russell T Davies completes the most masterful BBC mini-series since ‘State of Play’, with perhaps the greatest writing of his career. Only one continuity error interrupts the otherwise overwhelming and horrific finale to Torchwood’s greatest triumph and their biggest failure. As Prime Minister Brian Green (Nicholas Farrell) betrays Peter Capaldi’s John Frobisher, the inhumanity of the human race to itself becomes clear. And what it takes to tip into fascism turns out to be very little indeed – a casual prejudice here, an abuse of power there, a lie to cover everything up, all in the name of ambition and keeping the status quo. The political commentary veers between an allegory with Nazism, as the children are indeed bussed away to their deaths for a creature which deals in them as drugs, and an indictment of our real world government’s preparedness to sacrifice basic human rights and civil liberties in the name of ‘keeping us safe’. Its severity is surprising for a franchise which has been so flakey in its first two outings, but it couldn’t be more welcome. Writing series 3 for adults has transformed Torchwood beyond all recognition, and has interestingly again (as with Dead Set) proven the value of daily, serialised television.

Day 5 doesn’t end with RTD doesn’t after all reaching for easy answers to ensure the defeat of the 456 – indeed quite the opposite. Humanity may be validated in the small scale sacrifices made by the most vulnerable people, but they’re outweighed by or preparedness to destroy one another. And in between Jack realises he must do the unthinkable if he’s to save 6 billion people, and there’s no coming back from killing your grandson.

The scene where Jack ensures humanity’s final victory is absolutely horrific. And yet again the horror has nothing at all to do with the alien/sci-fi element – the most horrible things done in ‘Children of Earth’ are perpetrated by our hero, and it ensures the franchise cannot go on as before – this is now a series with consequences. It’s challenging television – a biting political thriller, a painful human drama, and laced with commentary by Eve Myles’ Gwen Cooper acknowledging why the Doctor sometimes doesn’t intervene (as here), it really raises the bar for the future of the Whoniverse. If Davies really is to stay with Torchwood (which I hope is the case) he has set an extraordinary standard to maintain; similarly Steven Moffat will no doubt have watched ‘Children of Earth’ with Doctor Who series 5 in mind. I sincerely hope he takes his creation back on board – a broken yet immortal Captain Jack would be a very interesting addition to the cast alongside an unknown quantity eleventh Doctor…

Torchwood: Children of Earth: Day Four (Spoilers)

Day 4 descends into unexpected horror, in the best-written, acted and directed episode of ‘Torchwood’ since the franchise’s inception. Writer John Fay, director Euros Lyn and the cast never hit a wrong note and leave you slackjawed after an hour of dark twists, shocking turns and the sort of quality you’d expect from ‘Spooks’ at its best. But that’s the ground ‘Torchwood’ now occupies – edgy adult drama where anything really can happen.

I saw very little of day 4 coming. I didn’t see the strength of the team’s plot against the government catching even the evil henchwoman off guard. I never thought the government would so happily capitulate with the 456. I never thought the 456 would kill everyone in its path when stood up to, even Jack and Ianto.

Ianto?

I actually welled up. Gareth David-Lloyd and John Barrowman’s characters ironically show more love for each other when Ianto is killed than they did in life, bringing out the sheer horror that it is to be Captain Jack, the man who can’t die, and putting the lie to his daughter’s claim that a man who can’t die has nothing to fear. His previous appearances painted him as a cocky superhero – he’s now changed to a man who can’t risk feeling anything about anyone, cursed by Rose’s gift of immortality. But that wasn’t the only strength of day 4.

Fay’s detailed cabinet discussions on dispatching 10% of the child population of the country (and the world) are even more horrific. Their casual collusion with the murderous, unseen alien, with their talk of ‘units’, ‘mystery jabs’ (Peter Capaldi’s Frobisher now resembling his spin doctor of ‘In The Loop’) and ‘low achievers’ is unlike anything I’ve seen in a programme of this kind on the BBC before. In many ways the government’s discrimination-ridden attitudes in choosing to kill all poor children are even worse than the alien’s plans. ‘What (else) are the school league tables for?’ Woah now a fierce political/social commentary which doesn’t just make you wonder, but makes this government even more dangerous than The Master’s. I’ve seen this episode likened to ‘State of Play’ – it’s not an unfair comparison.

The team is broken, humanity is at war with itself. Will RTD ruin everything with an awful, joyous reaffirmation of humanity’s shared solidarity again (as in ‘Last of the Time Lords‘), or will we get a thoroughly darker resolution? After this episode’s shocks and terrible sadness he has to tread very carefully indeed.